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40 lbs total!
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40 lbs total!
12/5/12 1:01 PM
I started a weight loss program in January and was losing but not quickly. I found Beachboday in July. The workouts and shakeology helped me to lose more, but then I gained 4lbs back. Where I notice the difference is in the 4 pants sizes I lost, the decrease in my love handles, and the beginning of thickness in my biceps tris and chest. I did not do as well as I wanted, but I did it. Thats a huge accomplishment for me. Ninety days of exercise.
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RE: 40 lbs total!
1/6/13 5:55 AM as a reply to ALLFitness1.
Wow that's terrific, way to go! I just ordered Shakeology I look forward to trying it.
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RE: 40 lbs total!
1/7/13 1:27 PM as a reply to girlgetfit.
Thanks for the comment and the view. Sorry for the delay in responding as well.
emoticon
I just received another months supply. My goal is 195 which will be a total of 53 lbs!!
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RE: 40 lbs total!
1/10/13 12:38 PM as a reply to ALLFitness1.
Hey there....thanks for the buddy add. Always nice to surround yourself with like minded people..emoticon
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RE: 40 lbs total!
1/10/13 3:53 PM as a reply to ALLFitness1.
Awesome job!!!!
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RE: 40 lbs total!
1/10/13 5:19 PM as a reply to ALLFitness1.
Thank you very much. I have about 20 more lbs to go. Goal is 195. I'm getting there..emoticon Thanks for checking out my board. emoticon
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RE: 40 lbs total!
1/10/13 5:22 PM as a reply to ALLFitness1.
Some good info from my Coach:

Modifications for ARX

Bicycles – Lay all the way back and lift feet higher in the air. Try to lower them as you get stronger.

In-and-outs – Bend Knees and place heels on the floor. Just move your upper body or lean back on elbows and just move legs in and out.

Crunchy Frog - similar mods as In-and-out but do the opposite.

Heels to Heaven - you can keep feet on the floor and just raise your hips up and toward your chest. Make sure you are squeezing your lower abs.

Hip rock and raise – Same mod as Heels to heaven or you can try to do heels to heaven – that’s easier than this one.

Phifer Scissors – If you can’t keep your leg off the ground while the other is going up in the air, you can rest it on the ground until you get stronger.

Wide leg sit ups – do crunches instead.

V-up Roll up – crunches alternating with legs lifting in air

1 leg climb – Hold leg up if you can, if not, place foot on the floor and reach with one arm as high as you can in a crunching motion.

Oblique v up- You can stand up and hold weights in each hand. Lean over to one side and go as low as you can without bending at the waist. Do 25 on each side.

Mason Twists – You can do these standing up to start but hold a weight to give some resistance. If you can , sit up and just reach for the opposite knee instead of trying to touch the floor with both hands.
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RE: 40 lbs total!
1/11/13 11:04 AM as a reply to ALLFitness1.
Well I'm past the one month mark. Loving Power90 alot more than P90X. It's geared more to what I need. I admit though, after this I AM doing Beast!!

The workouts in P90 are just the right length. Thirty five to fifty five minutes is perfect for me, not only for fatigue purposes, but for scheduling time. It's easier for me to stick to a 35-55 minute routine than one that goes over an hour. Or longer!

I still need to work on nutrition. I do really well for 3-4 days then I slip. I have to work on my will power and filling up on healthy things. Of course it doesnt help that everyone in my house loves to bake...emoticon Anyway, I'm getting it done and enjoying the people I'm meeting. They definitly keep me motivated and hold me accountable. I need that, so thanks you!

George
Team Elite Home Fitness
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RE: 40 lbs total!
1/13/13 1:29 PM as a reply to ALLFitness1.
So ive been using EandE before my workouts. I was totally amazed at the difference it makes in my performance. I was skeptical at first, but had read how well it works. So, leap of.faith here...emoticon The first day i tried E&E i thougt it tasted awful! However i have grown accustomed to the taste. Dont mind it at all. On top of that i make it through my workout with energy left over!
So, i highly recommend that you give it a try. Its inexpensive and it.works.
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RE: 40 lbs total!
1/14/13 7:33 AM as a reply to ALLFitness1.
So Ive been seeing and hearing alot about soreness after a workout. I've posted a little before on this topic, however I thought it would be good to post again, this time with a list of resources so you can research this topic on your own. It is something I struggle with every day. I thought it was due to my age, but I'm hearing it from people younger than me. So I assume that it's just an all time issue we have to deal with. So below is some information regarding soreness and some reference links to help you out.

8 Essential Ways to Help Reduce Soreness

1: Stretch. Stretching is your first line of defense after a good workout. "When you train, you contract the muscles, and the muscle fibers get shorter," says Steve Edwards, Head of Fitness and Nutrition Development at Beachbody®. "Lengthening them after a workout promotes mobility, and can lead to a more thorough recovery." While fitness experts can't seem to agree on this strategy[1]—one Australian study[2] claimed that stretching had no impact on muscle soreness—it certainly won't hurt, especially if your flexibility is limited.

2: Eat for rapid recovery. In a study on "nutrient timing," researchers found that a postworkout drink with between a 3:1 to 5:1 carb-to-protein ratio reduced muscle damage and improved recovery times[3]. A tough workout depletes blood sugar, as well as the glycogen stored in your muscles. Restoring that supply within an hour of finishing your workout is your body's top priority. P90X® Results and Recovery Formula® is optimized with the 4:1 ratio, but in a pinch, down a glass of grape juice with whey protein powder or a glass of chocolate milk. Denis Faye, Beachbody's Nutrition Expert, explains. "When the sugar [from the drink] rushes into your muscles to restore that supply, the protein piggybacks to jump-start the recovery process."

3: Ice it. Immediately after a tough workout, icing your muscles can stave off inflammation. "Inflammation is one of nature's defense mechanisms, but it works like a cast—it immobilizes you," Edwards says. "When you keep inflammation down, that area is free to keep moving, and movement promotes healing." Like stretching, its effectiveness is up for debate—some researchers have claimed that ice is only effective for injuries and not for run-of-the-mill soreness[4], but it's a simple and safe option that many top-level athletes swear by[5]. "Unless you ice so long that you give yourself frostbite, there's really no danger," Edwards says. "It seems to really speed up healing without any adverse effects."

4: Change your diet. "When your muscles are sore, inflammation is a huge part of the problem," Faye says. To help reduce this inflammation, add foods that are rich in omega-3s—such as salmon, free-range meat, flax, avocado, and walnuts[6]—to your diet. The natural anti-inflammatory propertiesof these foods can help dial back the soreness after overexertion. Amino acid supplements can also help with muscle recovery after a high-intensity workout.

5: Massage your sore spots. A recent study found that massage can reduce inflammatory compounds called cytokines. One type of massage that's gaining popularity is myofascial release, which targets the connective tissue covering the muscles. You can hit these areas yourself using a foam roller—put the roller on the floor, use your body weight to apply pressure, and roll back and forth over the sore areas for about 60 seconds. But . . . before you do, make sure you're rehydrated and your heart rate is back to normal. "When your muscles are hot and loaded with lactic acid, you might make it worse," Edwards says. For a more detailed tutorial on foam rolling, check out the Beachbody Tai Cheng® program.

6: Get heated. While ice can work wonders immediately after a workout, heat can help once your muscles have returned to their resting temperature. "Heat increases circulation, especially focused heat in a jacuzzi, where you can hit areas like joints that don't normally get a lot of circulation," Edwards says. Just don't jump in the hot tub immediately after a workout, because the heat can exacerbate inflammation, and the jets can pound your already-damaged muscles. Edwards cautions, "When your body heat is already high and you have a lot of muscle breakdown, sitting in a hot tub with the jets would be counterintuitive."

7: Move it. You may be tempted to plant yourself on the couch until the pain subsides, but don't skip your next workout. Circulation promotes healing, so it helps to get your heart pumping—just don't overdo it. "Active recovery" is low-intensity exercise that gets your blood flowing without taxing your muscles. What qualifies as low-intensity? It depends on your typical workout. If you know your training zones, you can use a heart rate monitor. But, Edwards says, the easiest way to engage in active recovery is to exert around 50% of your max effort, and keep your heart rate below 140 bpm or so. Most Beachbody workout programs include a recovery workout, but if yours doesn't, a gentle yoga class or going on an easy hike are good options.

8: Pop a painkiller—if you must. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like ibuprofen can relieve pain, but many experts aren't sure if they're worth the risk. "A lot of athletes call it 'Vitamin I,'" Edwards says. But he cautions that NSAIDs can cause nasty side effects and accelerate muscle breakdown. "The only time they might help is if you're in so much pain that you can't do low-level exercise—you can't get off the couch," Edwards says. In that case, meds might help, but be careful not to overdo it—because if you're not feeling pain, you may push too hard and cause an injury.

Resources:

[1] http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/news/20071017/stretching-wont-prevent-sore-muscles?page=2
[2] http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071016195932.htm
[3] http://www.utexas.edu/features/archive/2004/nutrition.html
[4] http://www.upmc.com/Services/sports-medicine/newsletter/Pages/ice-after-exercise.aspx
[5] http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/02/20/really-the-claim-an-ice-bath-can-soothe-sore-muscles/
[6] http://www.webmd.com/diet/ss/slideshow-omega-3-health-benefits
[7] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16531187
[8] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20300014
[9] http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/02/06/how-massage-heals-sore-muscles
[10] http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/29108.php
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RE: 40 lbs total!
1/14/13 7:46 AM as a reply to ALLFitness1.
First off, I am no expert on this subject. That being said, I did a little research into how many calories you need to take in each day. The reason I was looking up this information is that I have had a couple potential customers ask how I have lost 40 lbs and how many calories did I take in to do that. The answer is not cut and dry. So I looked up what a person who is very active as opposed to sedentary person needs for caloric intake each day.

Here is the breakdown of calories when you add in exercise at the various levels.

Sedentary - 2116 calories
Lightly Active - 2425 calories
Moderately Active - 2734 calories
Very Active - 3042 calories
Extra or Extremely Active - 3351 calories

Let me explain what each of the categories are.
1. If you are sedentary (little or no exercise)
2. If you are lightly active (light exercise/sports 1-3 days/week) :
3. If you are moderately active (moderate exercise/sports 3-5 days/week) :
4. If you are very active (hard exercise/sports 6-7 days a week) :
5. If you are extremely active (very hard exercise/sports & physical job or 2x training):

So you would have to take a calorie deficit to lose weight. How much of a deficit would you take? 1 lb is equal to 3500 calories. Therefore if you take a calorie deficit of 500 calories per day you will lose 1 lb a week. There is the mathematical equation for that. (500 calories X 7 days = 3500 calories ) ie: 1 lb per week. Taking a calorie deficit of 1000 calories per day will give you cause your body to lose approximately 2 lbs per week.

So if you want to lose 1 lb per week, you minus 500 from the numbers listed in each of the categories. Depending on what category you place yourself in will determine your calories.

I hope this helps you in planning your dietary needs. C'mon and join our team to stay up to date on so many of your fitness questions

George
Team Elite Home Fitness
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RE: 40 lbs total!
1/14/13 8:17 AM as a reply to ALLFitness1.
Are you a person who enjoys being involved in fitness? You don't have to be an expert to help others achieve their weight loss and fitness goals and start leading a healthier lifestyle. I am currently looking for people interested to do exactly that while getting paid for it to join my team! Message me if you would like to apply. It's inexpensive to join, you get discounts on all you favorite Beachbody products, and it motivates you to stay healthy. At least it does for me. Beachbody keeps me accountable. So, message or call me if interested.

George LaPenta
Team Elite Home Fitness
www.allfitness1@beachbodycoach.com
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RE: 40 lbs total!
1/14/13 11:57 AM as a reply to ALLFitness1.
The best way to manage your stress is to learn healthy coping strategies. You can start practicing these tips right away. Try one or two until you find a few that work for you. Practice these techniques until they become habits you turn to when you feel stress. You can also use this coping strategies form(What is a PDF document?) to see how you respond to stress.

Stress-relief techniques focus on relaxing your mind and your body.

Ways to relax your mind

Write. It may help to write about things that are bothering you. Write for 10 to 15 minutes a day about stressful events and how they made you feel. Or think about starting a stress journal. This helps you find out what is causing your stress and how much stress you feel. After you know, you can find better ways to cope.
Let your feelings out. Talk, laugh, cry, and express anger when you need to. Talking with friends, family, a counselor, or a member of the clergy about your feelings is a healthy way to relieve stress.

Do something you enjoy. This can be:
A hobby, such as gardening.
A creative activity, such as writing, crafts, or art.
Playing with and caring for pets.
Volunteer work.
You may feel that you're too busy to do these things. But making time to do something you enjoy can help you relax. It might also help you get more done in other areas of your life.
Focus on the present. Meditation and guided imagery are two ways to focus and relax your mind.
Meditate. When you meditate, you focus your attention on things that are happening right now. Paying attention to your breathing is one way to focus. For more information,

Stress Management: Doing Meditation.

Use guided imagery. With guided imagery, you imagine yourself in any setting that helps you feel calm and relaxed. You can use audiotapes, books, or a teacher to guide you. To learn more, see:
Stress Management: Doing Guided Imagery to Relax.
Ways to relax your body

Exercise. Regular exercise is one of the best ways to manage stress. Walking is a great way to get started. Even everyday activities such as housecleaning or yard work can reduce stress. Stretching can also relieve muscle tension. For more information about becoming more active, see the topic Fitness.
Try techniques to relax. Breathing exercises, muscle relaxation, and yoga can help relieve stress.

Breathing exercises. These include roll breathing, a type of deep breathing. Stress Management: Breathing Exercises for Relaxation.
Progressive muscle relaxation. This technique reduces muscle tension. You do it by relaxing separate groups of muscles one by one.

Yoga, tai chi, and qi gong. These techniques combine exercise and meditation. You may need some training at first to learn them. Books and videos are also helpful. You can do all of these techniques at home. For more information on yoga,

Try a combination of these. I've found that a walk helps me tremendously as do the breathing exercises mentioned above. If you have any questions contact me here or even your health care provider.

George LaPenta
Team Elite Home Fitness.
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RE: 40 lbs total!
1/14/13 12:04 PM as a reply to ALLFitness1.
FOR ALL YOU FISH LOVERS!!! MYSELF INCLUDED. TRY THIS ONE. SOOOO GOOD

The world's oceans sure provide us with super fish, and when we flavor it with these Mediterranean flavors, we can provide our families with another reason to say OOH IT'S SO GOOD!!

Serves: 4

Cooking Time: 20 min

What You'll Need:
1 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon pepper
3/4 cup milk
6 sole fillets (about 2 pounds total)
3/4 cup (1½ sticks) butter, divided
Juice of 1 lemon
1 cup sliced almonds
1 tablespoon fresh chopped parsley
What To Do:


In a shallow dish, combine the flour and pepper. Place the milk in a separate shallow dish. Dip the fillets in the milk, then in the flour mixture. In a large skillet, heat 1/4 cup butter over medium-low heat; add the fillets and sauté, turning after 3 to 4 minutes until the fillets are browned on both sides and they flake easily with a fork.


Remove the fish to a heated platter. Add the remaining butter to the skillet, then add the almonds and brown. Stir in the lemon juice and parsley, then pour over the fish and serve.


Notes
The thickness of sole fillets will vary, and so will the cooking time, so make certain the fillets are cooked through.


Read more at http://www.mrfood.com/Fish/Almond-Butter-Sole-1328/ct/1#hYyDUCv86m3hHXBM.99
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RE: 40 lbs total!
1/14/13 12:06 PM as a reply to ALLFitness1.
The world's oceans sure provide us with super fish, and when we flavor it with these Mediterranean flavors, we can provide our families with another reason to say OOH IT'S SO GOOD!!

Serves: 4

Cooking Time: 20 min

What You'll Need:
1 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon pepper
3/4 cup milk
6 sole fillets (about 2 pounds total)
3/4 cup (1½ sticks) butter, divided
Juice of 1 lemon
1 cup sliced almonds
1 tablespoon fresh chopped parsley
What To Do:


In a shallow dish, combine the flour and pepper. Place the milk in a separate shallow dish. Dip the fillets in the milk, then in the flour mixture. In a large skillet, heat 1/4 cup butter over medium-low heat; add the fillets and sauté, turning after 3 to 4 minutes until the fillets are browned on both sides and they flake easily with a fork.


Remove the fish to a heated platter. Add the remaining butter to the skillet, then add the almonds and brown. Stir in the lemon juice and parsley, then pour over the fish and serve.


Notes
The thickness of sole fillets will vary, and so will the cooking time, so make certain the fillets are cooked through.


Read more at http://www.mrfood.com/Fish/Almond-Butter-Sole-1328/ct/1#hYyDUCv86m3hHXBM.99
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RE: 40 lbs total!
1/15/13 6:27 AM as a reply to ALLFitness1.
As some of you are aware, I work at the Department of Veterans Affairs as a Health Tech. One of the programs that I am involved in is the MOVE program. This is a weight loss/nutritional program for vets who are overweight or obese. It is a very intensive program that involves health Tech, Dietitians, Nutritionists, and pretty much the vets entire health care team. I have been doing the training for the MOVE program and I came across anoth chart reflecting caloric needs for the week/day. I though I would post it here. It's a pretty simple straight forward chart. For guys like me...emoticon

To lose weight, patients need to create a calorie deficit. A calorie deficit can be achieved through either:

decreased calorie intake, or
increased calorie expenditure through physical activity, or
both

An achievable and sustainable weight loss for most overweight and obese individuals is a rate between 0.5 lb – 2 lbs per week. For many Veterans/individuals, rates at the lower end of this range may be more achievable and sustainable since a smaller calorie deficit is required.

Calorie Deficit Table Rate of Weight Loss Approximate Weekly and Approximate Daily Calorie Deficit
0.5 lb 1750 250
1 lb 3500 500
1.5 lbs 5250 750
2 lbs 7000 1000

It is usually not necessary for Veterans/individuals enrolled in MOVE! to "count" calorie intake and expenditure religiously. Healthy food choices and increases in physical activity will create a calorie deficit for most.

A daily 250 Calories deficit translates to a weight loss of 26 lb per year. This calorie deficit can be achieved by moderate physical activity for 30 minutes daily, or by eliminating one 20–oz bottle of regular soda from daily diet, or by eliminating 2 regular sized cookies from daily diet.

What I liked about this descriptions is the examples given in the last paragraph. It makes it so do-able when it's broken down like that. So if you double that, eliminate two sugary drinks and four cookies daily you may well see an even greater loss at the end of the year. I truly hope this helps.
If you want more information about a LARGE variety of health and nutrition needs, join my team, Team Elite Home Fitness. Send me a buddy request for more info or email me at allfitness1@beachbodycoach.com OR spikey111@comcast.net. THANKS and have a healthy day.

George LaPenta
Team Elite Home Fitness
Western Massachusetts
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RE: 40 lbs total!
1/15/13 6:28 AM as a reply to ALLFitness1.
A little additional info on the above.

Creating a Calorie Deficit in a Safe and Healthy Way--- Individual calorie needs vary with age, sex, and level of physical activity. MyPyramid.gov, the newest version of the Food Guide Pyramid from the US Department of Agriculture, has an interactive tool available to determine individual energy needs. The table below from MyPyramid.gov provides estimates for various categories.

Calorie Needs Table Calorie Range
Sedentary ——> Active
Females
19–30 years
30–50 years
51+ years 2,000 ——> 2,400
1,800 ——> 2,200
1,600 ——> 2,200
Males
19–30 years
31–50 years
50+ years 2,400 ——> 3,000
2,200 ——> 3,000
2,000 ——> 2,800 .

These estimates are based on energy needs of a person with a healthy weight. Thus, a Veteran who is overweight/obese may be able to create a gradual calorie deficit and lose weight slowly by maintaining food intake near these levels. Faster weight loss can be achieved by increasing levels of physical activity or by reducing energy intake resulting in a net calorie intake below these levels.
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RE: 40 lbs total!
1/15/13 7:03 AM as a reply to ALLFitness1.
Heres a good example of physical activity durations and some examples of the type of physical activity you can do to reach these levels and attain your goal of proper and safe weight loss. Remember, to much weight loss per week also means the loss of lean muscle which we want to avoid.

Physical activity: Health Benefits vs. Weight Loss vs. Fitness--Veterans who have maintained a regular program of physical activity are to be sincerely applauded for their efforts. Counseling of Veterans in this phase is largely focused on continued encouragement and support, along with relapse prevention. The next to last lesson will discuss relapse prevention in greater detail. Some basic strategies for relapse prevention include:

Helping the Veteran define maintainable goals. Revise goals as individual situations arise.
Remember that social support often drops over time; provide on–going follow–up and encourage Veterans to seek out activity partners.
Help incorporate physical activity into daily routine so it becomes a habit.
Build in rewards.
Contingency Planning —

Help the Veteran create alternative plans for physical activity for the following high–risk scenarios that often lead to a lapse in habits:

Bad weather
Change of job or work schedule
Out–of–town travel or vacation
Increasing family or work demands on time
Loss of access to gym, track, pool
Injury or illness
In concrete terms, this relationship translates to the following recommendations* for various physical activity goals:

Physical Activity Recommendations Goal Duration and Intensity Frequency

Health benefits--- 150 minutes (per week) of moderate
75 minutes (per week) of vigorous In 10–min episodes
Spaced over the week

Significant weight loss 90 minutes (per day) of moderate
60 minutes (per day) of vigorous 5–7 days per week
Weight loss maintenance 60 minutes (per day) of moderate
30 minutes (per day) of vigorous 5–7 days per week
Cardiorespiratory fitness 45–60 minutes (per day) of vigorous 5–7 days per week

Many sedentary individuals may be intimidated by the frequency and duration associated with significant weight loss; thus, it may be helpful to initially emphasize physical activity goals for health benefits. Remember that energy expenditure is an important part of the energy balance equation and that even small daily expenditures in a previously sedentary individual can accumulate and result in small–modest amounts of weight loss over time. Because individuals’ metabolisms vary, some will lose weight at the lower end of the physical activity recommendations, whereas others may need levels at the higher end just to prevent weight gain. Advise Veterans to start slowly if they have been inactive. Stick to the initial plan, even if it seems too easy at first. With success, challenge Veterans to continue to increase the duration, frequency, and intensity of their activities.

The following are helpful questions to ask individuals when setting goals and choosing activities:

What are some of the opportunities you see in your everyday life to be more physically active?
What activities do you enjoy?
What equipment and/or facilities do you have access to?
What can you do over the next week to be more physically active?

The following are examples of physical activity goals:

I will take the stairs instead of the elevator at least 5 times in the next 2 weeks.
I will walk 10 minutes without stopping for a rest every morning for the next week.
I will replace 30 minutes of television with 30 minutes of stretching every day for the next 2 weeks.
I will include two sessions of strength training per week.
I will find out what kinds of physical activity offerings are happening in my community this week.
I will buy some walking shoes this week.

I hope this helps. If you'd like more information contact our team.

George LaPenta
Team Elite Home Fitness
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RE: 40 lbs total!
1/16/13 8:19 AM as a reply to ALLFitness1.
You can almost hear the theme of JAWS playing in the background as the infamous craving approaches. You’ve eaten well all day, and then — BAM! — the craving strikes, and you head straight for the chips, ice cream and leftover spaghetti with meatballs.

Intellectually you know that gobbling down high-calorie food in the evening leaves you feeling frustrated, heavy and defeated. Yet, when those p.m. cravings hit, they’re often impossible to resist.

What are cravings and where do they come from?
A food craving is an intense desire to consume a particular food. For example, if you are craving chocolate, eating carrot sticks is most likely not going to satisfy the craving (no news there!). What’s more, research shows that women tend to crave sweets, like chocolate, cookies and ice cream, while men tend to crave heartier food like steak, mashed potatoes, burgers, pasta and pizza. Numerous studies have also shown that a craving does not indicate a nutritional need or deficiency. So sadly, we can throw that excuse out the window.

Here’s why we crave:

Learned behaviors and experiences
As a child, you may have been consistently rewarded with a sweet treat when you had a bad day. The learned behavior of having something sweet to lift your spirits became a habit that is very hard to break.
Hormonal fluctuations
Certain hormones in your body help control appetite. Ghrelin is the hormone you produce that drives you to eat, while leptin is the hormone that signals satiety. Normally, these hormones act as a checks and balances system to keep your appetite in check. However, under certain physiological conditions, such as sleep deprivation, this system is thrown off because the hormones are not produced in proper proportion to one another. Estrogen, cortisol and serotonin can also play a role in food craving frenzies, and whether due to stress, sleep deprivation, or the normal hormonal fluctuations of a woman’s menstrual cycle, these hormones can drive you to seek out nutrient- dense, fatty, sugary foods.
Environmental factors and sensory stimulation
Studies have found that the sight, smell, taste, or even just the thought of favorite foods can lead to intense cravings. Experiences like seeing food advertisements on TV or passing a bakery and smelling the aroma of fresh baked bread can also initiate food cravings. Certain social settings, like a party or environmental factors, such as dim lighting in a restaurant, can fuel our drive to indulge.
Why are cravings so irresistible at night?
Nighttime may be the first time you get to relax after a long, structured and stressful day. You’re through with work and the kids are asleep; it’s finally your time. Whether it is behavioral or hormonal, the urge to treat yourself with a decadent or savory food can be an overwhelming response from the body’s need for relaxation. In addition, you may be tired or emotional from the stress of the day, which makes it that much harder to fight the impulse to indulge. Plus, all those television food commercials don’t help!

Crush cravings with the following strategies:

Control late-night hunger
Eat breakfast within 90 minutes of waking and every five hours throughout day. This keeps blood sugar level, which in turn keeps you from overeating or binging at night.

Eat a fiber-rich dinner
The soluble fiber keeps your blood sugars stable, and the insoluble fiber keeps you full through those evening hours so you don’t have an intense urge to snack. Start your dinner with either a hearty non-starchy vegetable soup or large tossed vegetable salad, and drink plenty of water throughout the meal.

Push dinner back an hour
If you regularly overeat later in the evening, consider starting dinner at 7 instead of 6. This leaves you less awake time to snack.

Out of house, out of mouth
No matter how amazing your will power and determination may be, surrounding yourself with lots of tempting treats could lead to disaster. Keep problematic goodies out of your house. If it’s unavailable, you can’t eat it.

Pre-plan and stretch your p.m. snack
People often “crave” what they’ve planned for. Plan for something healthy and you’re likely to crave it.
And if you’re a volume eater, pre-plan snacks that last a while. For example, a lollipop, four cups air popped popcorn, one to two sliced cucumbers with spicy salsa, a handful of pistachio nuts in the shell, or a low-fat fudge bar.

Keep yourself busy, in and out of the house
Downtime tends to be “craving central.” Knitting, drawing, solving a puzzle and exercising are some things you can engage in that will squash your desire to munch. If you’re watching TV at night, find ways to distract yourself during commercials, particularly food commercials. Check your e-mail, do crunches or pushups, jump rope, plan your calendar for the rest of the week, make that call to your mother-in-law, etc. It’s also a great idea to get out of the house a few nights each week. Taking a nighttime yoga, dance or spin class will get you moving and allow you to be part of something. Find a local book club or card game to join. Being social can be a real mood elevator, replacing that need to munch.
Fore more information on healthy eating, visit Joy Bauer’s Web site at www.joybauernutrition.com

© 2012 NBCNews.com Reprints

I absolutely loved this article. It will help me with this issue and I hope that it will help you as well.

George LaPenta
Team Elite Home Fitness.
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RE: 40 lbs total!
1/18/13 7:13 AM as a reply to ALLFitness1.
DETOX SHAKEOLOGY!!

Stick to your New years resolution with this new recipe from Shakeology.

Some of you Beachbody® newbies might be experiencing Shakeology for the first time. While it's awesome on its own, here's a little badly kept secret: it also tastes great when you add stuff to it. So here's a little recipe for you. Ginger and lemon juice are both wonderful detoxifiers, so drink up and let the cleansing begin!

Total Time: 5 min.
Prep Time: 5 min.
Cook Time: 0 min.
Preparation Difficulty: Easy
Ingredients:
3/4 cup water
1 cup diced watermelon
1 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice
1 tsp. grated raw ginger root
1 scoop Tropical Strawberry Shakeology
1 cup ice cubes
Preparation:
Place water, watermelon, lemon juice, ginger, Shakeology, and ice in blender canister. Cover; blend until smooth.

Nutritional Information: (per serving)
Calories Fat Saturated Fat Cholesterol Sodium Carbs Fiber Sugar Protein

211 1g 0 g 0 mg 76 mg 33 g 5 g 20 g 16 g

George
Team Elite Home Fitness

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