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How much should I expect to lose?
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So I've just wrapped my second week of Insanity. The first week I dropped 5 lbs, this week 2 lbs. I know I can't drop 5 lbs every week but I was wondering what a good target goal is? I feel absolutely amazing though and I've noticed increased stamina as well.

About me:

37 male, 6', currently at 200 lbs. I'd love to get down to 185. My diet is fairly good (or so I think). Three scrambled eggs in the morning, two chicken breasts at lunch with vegetables, water all day long, and a high protein dinner with vegetables.

I'm sure this has been posted a thousand times, so I apologize if its redundant.

Thoughts? Suggestions?
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RE: How much should I expect to lose?
12/7/12 8:04 AM as a reply to SteveZoog.
This is a question pretty hard to answer. Everybody results are different, as it depends on how much body fat you are starting with, if you are following the nutrition guide and staying accountable.

For someone overweight, I would say 2-3 pounds per week is do able.

Good work my friend for your results so far, stay accountable and the results will be there!
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RE: How much should I expect to lose?
12/7/12 9:36 AM as a reply to SteveZoog.
SteveZoog:
So I've just wrapped my second week of Insanity. The first week I dropped 5 lbs, this week 2 lbs. I know I can't drop 5 lbs every week but I was wondering what a good target goal is? I feel absolutely amazing though and I've noticed increased stamina as well.

About me:

37 male, 6', currently at 200 lbs. I'd love to get down to 185. My diet is fairly good (or so I think). Three scrambled eggs in the morning, two chicken breasts at lunch with vegetables, water all day long, and a high protein dinner with vegetables.

I'm sure this has been posted a thousand times, so I apologize if its redundant.

Thoughts? Suggestions?


Nice work Steve!

Don't worry as much about the scale, as how your clothes feel. 7 lbs in 2 weeks is excellent! As you get closer to your goal, nutrition is going to play a huge roll! I would add mid morning and afternoon snack to your meal plan. You need to increase your metabolism by eating more often. Have protien shake/ bar or Greek yogurt with apple for a snack.

Keep moving forward !

In Health,
Coach Jeff
CPT,PES
motivFIT
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RE: How much should I expect to lose?
12/7/12 4:08 PM as a reply to SteveZoog.
Impossible to predict specific numbers, Steve, but your initial progress is great and you really don't have too much to lose. I bet you'll hit your goal.

SteveZoog:
So I've just wrapped my second week of Insanity. The first week I dropped 5 lbs, this week 2 lbs. I know I can't drop 5 lbs every week but I was wondering what a good target goal is? I feel absolutely amazing though and I've noticed increased stamina as well.

About me:

37 male, 6', currently at 200 lbs. I'd love to get down to 185. My diet is fairly good (or so I think). Three scrambled eggs in the morning, two chicken breasts at lunch with vegetables, water all day long, and a high protein dinner with vegetables.

I'm sure this has been posted a thousand times, so I apologize if its redundant.

Thoughts? Suggestions?
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RE: How much should I expect to lose?
12/8/12 4:22 PM as a reply to CoachJeffMorgan.
motivFIT:

Nice work Steve!

Don't worry as much about the scale, as how your clothes feel. 7 lbs in 2 weeks is excellent! As you get closer to your goal, nutrition is going to play a huge roll! I would add mid morning and afternoon snack to your meal plan. You need to increase your metabolism by eating more often. Have protien shake/ bar or Greek yogurt with apple for a snack.

Keep moving forward !

In Health,
Coach Jeff
CPT,PES
motivFIT


Jeff,

I find it interesting that you believe that meal frequency or how many meals one eats impacts metabolism by raising it when I can't find any studies to back that up. When one say calculates caloric needs they don't ask you how many meals you eat.

Br J Nutr. 2008 Jun;99(6):1316-21. Epub 2007 Dec 6.
Acute effects on metabolism and appetite profile of one meal difference in the lower range of meal frequency.
Smeets AJ, Westerterp-Plantenga MS.
Source
Department of Human Biology, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD, Maastricht, The Netherlands. astrid.smeets@hb.unimaas.nl
Abstract
A gorging pattern of food intake has been shown to enhance lipogenesis and increase body weight, which may be due to large fluctuations in storage and mobilisation of nutrients. In a state of energy balance, increasing meal frequency, and thereby decreasing inter-meal interval, may prevent large metabolic fluctuations. Our aim was to study the effect of the inter-meal interval by dividing energy intake over two or three meals on energy expenditure, substrate oxidation and 24 h satiety, in healthy, normal-weight women in a state of energy balance. The study was a randomised crossover design with two experimental conditions. During the two experimental conditions subjects (fourteen normal-weight women, aged 24.4 (SD 7.1) years, underwent 36 h sessions in energy balance in a respiration chamber for measurements of energy expenditure and substrate oxidation. The subjects were given two (breakfast, dinner) or three (breakfast, lunch, dinner) meals per d. We chose to omit lunch in the two meals condition, because this resulted in a marked difference in inter-meal-interval after breakfast (8.5 h v. 4 h). Eating three meals compared with two meals had no effects on 24 h energy expenditure, diet-induced thermogenesis, activity-induced energy expenditure and sleeping metabolic rate. Eating three meals compared with two meals increased 24 h fat oxidation, but decreased the amount of fat oxidised from the breakfast. The same amount of energy divided over three meals compared with over two meals increased satiety feelings over 24 h. In healthy, normal-weight women, decreasing the inter-meal interval sustains satiety, particularly during the day, and sustains fat oxidation, particularly during the night.
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RE: How much should I expect to lose?
12/8/12 4:30 PM as a reply to SteveZoog.
I too would like to see evidence that eating more frequently increases your metabolism to any significant degree.
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RE: How much should I expect to lose?
12/8/12 4:35 PM as a reply to jfan.
jfan:
I too would like to see evidence that eating more frequently increases your metabolism to any significant degree.


You must of posted before mine as I posted a study saying there is none.

Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2001 Apr;25(4):519-28.
Compared with nibbling, neither gorging nor a morning fast affect short-term energy balance in obese patients in a chamber calorimeter.

RESULTS:
From experiment 6vs2 the difference between energy expenditure with six meals (10.00 MJ) and two meals (9.96 MJ) was not significant (P=0.88). Energy expenditure between 23:00 h and 08:00 h ('night') was, however, significantly higher (P=0.02) with two meals (9.12 MJ/24 h) compared with six meals (8.34 MJ/24 h). The pattern of spontaneous physical activity did not differ significantly between these two meal patterns (P>0.05). Total energy intake was affected by neither meal frequency in experiment 6+vs2+ (10.75 MJ with six, 11.08 MJ with two; P=0.58) nor a morning fast in experiment 6+vsAMFAST (8.55 MJ/24 h with six, 7.60 MJ with AMFAST; P=0.40). The total diet of subjects who had a morning fast tended to have a lower percentage of total energy from carbohydrate (40%) than when they had six meals per 24 h (49%) (P=0.05). Subsequent energy balance was affected by neither meal frequency (6vs2; P=0.88, 6+vs2+; P=0.50) nor a morning fast (P=0.18).
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RE: How much should I expect to lose?
12/9/12 8:26 AM as a reply to JCFitCoach.
JCFitCoach:
jfan:
I too would like to see evidence that eating more frequently increases your metabolism to any significant degree.


You must of posted before mine as I posted a study saying there is none.

Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2001 Apr;25(4):519-28.
Compared with nibbling, neither gorging nor a morning fast affect short-term energy balance in obese patients in a chamber calorimeter.

RESULTS:
From experiment 6vs2 the difference between energy expenditure with six meals (10.00 MJ) and two meals (9.96 MJ) was not significant (P=0.88). Energy expenditure between 23:00 h and 08:00 h ('night') was, however, significantly higher (P=0.02) with two meals (9.12 MJ/24 h) compared with six meals (8.34 MJ/24 h). The pattern of spontaneous physical activity did not differ significantly between these two meal patterns (P>0.05). Total energy intake was affected by neither meal frequency in experiment 6+vs2+ (10.75 MJ with six, 11.08 MJ with two; P=0.58) nor a morning fast in experiment 6+vsAMFAST (8.55 MJ/24 h with six, 7.60 MJ with AMFAST; P=0.40). The total diet of subjects who had a morning fast tended to have a lower percentage of total energy from carbohydrate (40%) than when they had six meals per 24 h (49%) (P=0.05). Subsequent energy balance was affected by neither meal frequency (6vs2; P=0.88, 6+vs2+; P=0.50) nor a morning fast (P=0.18).


Over the many years I have in the fitness industry one thing is certain. Eating smaller meals more frequently over the day increases your metabolism. Yes, there are studies out there that I have seen, however, I don't have the time to go research them and look them up. There are also studies that show that eat only a few times per day larger quantities of food ( 500 cals + ) in a sitting, the body cannot not digest it was well. Also, by wanting to eat for longer periods of time, the body will begin to store food as fat instead of burning it off.

Personally, I don't need a study to tell me this because I haven seen it work in my own live and have seen it work in the 100's of training clients that I have helped over the last 10 years. Every single client that switched their diet from eating 3 large meals a day to smaller meals (5-6), had huge results of losing weight.

There's a lot of good research and bad research out there. And every day there will be a new study that will counter what the previous study has show. All I know is that I have applied the principals of eating smaller meals more often to myself and my clients and that has produced tremendous results.

As far as evidence, instead of looking for a study to tell you this, why don't you try it for 90 days and see how it does for you. If it doesn't work then eat 2 meals a day and see how that works for you.

That's about all I have to say on this topic. Best of luck to all of you!

In Health,
Coach Jeff
CPT,PES
motivFIT
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RE: How much should I expect to lose?
12/9/12 9:58 AM as a reply to CoachJeffMorgan.
motivFIT:


Over the many years I have in the fitness industry one thing is certain. Eating smaller meals more frequently over the day increases your metabolism. Yes, there are studies out there that I have seen, however, I don't have the time to go research them and look them up. There are also studies that show that eat only a few times per day larger quantities of food ( 500 cals + ) in a sitting, the body cannot not digest it was well. Also, by wanting to eat for longer periods of time, the body will begin to store food as fat instead of burning it off.

Personally, I don't need a study to tell me this because I haven seen it work in my own live and have seen it work in the 100's of training clients that I have helped over the last 10 years. Every single client that switched their diet from eating 3 large meals a day to smaller meals (5-6), had huge results of losing weight.

There's a lot of good research and bad research out there. And every day there will be a new study that will counter what the previous study has show. All I know is that I have applied the principals of eating smaller meals more often to myself and my clients and that has produced tremendous results.

As far as evidence, instead of looking for a study to tell you this, why don't you try it for 90 days and see how it does for you. If it doesn't work then eat 2 meals a day and see how that works for you.

That's about all I have to say on this topic. Best of luck to all of you!

In Health,
Coach Jeff
CPT,PES
motivFIT


Let me say congrats on those 100's of clients getting results but it wasn't cause of eating 5-6 meals a day but creating a deficit by taking in less calories and getting off their behinds.

Like you I have seen lots of clients both mine and other trainers who are doing the 5-6 meals a day and not losing much so what is the problem? Also logic being that 5-6 meals increases metabolism why not 6-10 meals as that would increase it even more?

Let me ask you this, can you show me a calculation that asks for how many meals you eat to calculate calories? You wont as meal frequency is not a variable.

What studies show is not that one way is better than the other but that there is no real difference. Your Causation by Correlation is faulty. I have seen lots of clients from Martin Berkhan get crazy results from Intermittent Fasting or Brad Pilon's Eat Stop Eat which has you fasting 1-2 days a week.

"Eating smaller meals more frequently over the day increases your metabolism." Really that is funny as I have looked at over 200 and I probably have every single one saved and can't find anything on meal frequency increasing metabolism or being better for weight loss.

"Also, by wanting to eat for longer periods of time, the body will begin to store food as fat instead of burning it off." Seriously are you kidding me. If I am in a deficit what is my body going to store? If at the end of the day you are in a deficit you will lose not store. There is no storing what you don't have.

Isn't the whole concept behind body storing or losing based on being in a surplus or deficit of energy? Or what we refer to as the Energy Balance equation. And if this is true then your point is not a valid one.

"As far as evidence, instead of looking for a study to tell you this, why don't you try it for 90 days and see how it does for you. "

Well if I did try the 5-6 meals a day I would still lose as long as I was in a deficit and not cause of eating 5-6 times a day. What is being confused for metabolism is the Thermic Effect Of Food or energy required to break it down.

Also based on your logic I should be storing fat since I only have 2-3 meals tops and I am losing at 1-1.5 lbs a week.

I have also been able to drop 16 lbs in 90 day days following an Intermittent Fasting protocol and still eating all the foods not allowed by most trainers. So what does that prove? Nothing just that it works but may not be for everyone. Since I did IF that means I did not eat breakfast. So much for you have to eat breakfast.

Surely if I can take the time to find some studies showing no validity to the meal frequency and energy expenditure you can drum up 1 or 2 to show it does.

Like you I can use Causation by Correlation to show that eating 2-3 meals a day, skipping breakfast and fasting for 16-18 hours does not cause you to store fat but that you can lose.

You can see from my pictures I haven't stored fat and have a pretty decent amount of muscle even at 51. :-)

At the end of the day we need to find what works for us and clients whether its 5-6 meals a day, Intermittent Fasting, 2-3 meals a day etc.
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RE: How much should I expect to lose?
12/9/12 10:58 AM as a reply to CoachJeffMorgan.
I have gone to the trouble of finding some other interesting studies I have come across about topic at hand.

Eur J Clin Nutr. 1991 Mar;45(3):161-9.
Influence of the feeding frequency on nutrient utilization in man: consequences for energy metabolism. Verboeket-van de Venne WP, Westerterp KR.
Source
Department of Human Biology, University of Limburg, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
Abstract
A study was conducted to investigate whether there is a diurnal pattern of nutrient utilization in man and how this is affected by meal frequency to explain possible consequences of meal frequency for body weight regulation. When the daily energy intake is consumed in a small number of large meals, there is an increased chance to become overweight, possibly by an elevated lipogenesis (fat synthesis and accumulation) or storage of energy after the meal. Thirteen subjects, two males and eleven females, were fed to energy balance in two meals per day (gorging pattern) and seven meals per day (nibbling pattern) over 2-day intervals. On the second day on each feeding regimen, the diurnal pattern of nutrient utilization was calculated from simultaneous measurements of oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production and urinary nitrogen excretion over 3 h intervals in a respiration chamber. A gorging pattern of energy intake resulted in a stronger diurnal periodicity of nutrient utilization, compared to a nibbling pattern. However, there were no consequences for the total 24 h energy expenditure (24 h EE) of the two feeding patterns (5.57 +/- 0.16 kJ/min for the gorging pattern; 5.44 +/- 0.18 kJ/min for the nibbling pattern).

Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2001 Apr;25(4):519-28.
Compared with nibbling, neither gorging nor a morning fast affect short-term energy balance in obese patients in a chamber calorimeter.
Taylor MA, Garrow JS.
Source
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, King's College London, London, UK.
Abstract
OBJECTIVE:
To test if a diet of 4.2 MJ/24 h as six isocaloric meals would result in a lower subsequent energy intake, or greater energy output than (a) 4.2 MJ/24 h as two isocaloric meals or (b) a morning fast followed by free access to food.
DESIGN:
Subjects were confined to the Metabolic Unit from 19:00 h on day 1 to 09:30 h on day 6. Each day they had a fixed diet providing 4.2 MJ with three pairs of meal patterns which were offered in random sequence. They were: six meals vs two meals without access to additional foods (6vs2), or six meals vs 2 meals with access to additional food (6+vs2+), or six meals vs four meals (6+vsAMFAST). In the AMFAST condition the first two meals of the day were omitted to reduce daily intake to 2.8 MJ and to create a morning fast, but additional food was accessible thereafter. Patients were confined in the chamber calorimeter from 19:00 h on day 2 until 09:00 h on day 4, and then from 19:00 h on day 4 to 09:00 h on day 6. The order in which each meal pattern was offered was balanced over time.
MEASUREMENTS:
Energy expenditure (chamber calorimetry), spontaneous activity (video) and energy intake (where additional foods were available) during the final 24 h of each dietary component.
SUBJECTS:
Ten (6vs2), eight (6+vs2+) and eight (6+vsAMFAST) women were recruited who had a BMI of greater than 25 kg/m2.
RESULTS:
From experiment 6vs2 the difference between energy expenditure with six meals (10.00 MJ) and two meals (9.96 MJ) was not significant (P=0.88). Energy expenditure between 23:00 h and 08:00 h ('night') was, however, significantly higher (P=0.02) with two meals (9.12 MJ/24 h) compared with six meals (8.34 MJ/24 h). The pattern of spontaneous physical activity did not differ significantly between these two meal patterns (P>0.05). Total energy intake was affected by neither meal frequency in experiment 6+vs2+ (10.75 MJ with six, 11.08 MJ with two; P=0.58) nor a morning fast in experiment 6+vsAMFAST (8.55 MJ/24 h with six, 7.60 MJ with AMFAST; P=0.40). The total diet of subjects who had a morning fast tended to have a lower percentage of total energy from carbohydrate (40%) than when they had six meals per 24 h (49%) (P=0.05). Subsequent energy balance was affected by neither meal frequency (6vs2; P=0.88, 6+vs2+; P=0.50) nor a morning fast (P=0.18).
CONCLUSIONS:
In the short term, meal frequency and a period of fasting have no major impact on energy intake or expenditure but energy expenditure is delayed with a lower meal frequency compared with a higher meal frequency. This might be attributed to the thermogenic effect of food continuing into the night when a later, larger meal is given. A morning fast resulted in a diet which tended to have a lower percentage of energy from carbohydrate than with no fast.

Br J Nutr. 1997 Apr;77 Suppl 1:S57-70.
Meal frequency and energy balance.
Bellisle F, McDevitt R, Prentice AM.
Source
INSERM U341, Hotel Dieu de Paris, France.
Abstract
Several epidemiological studies have observed an inverse relationship between people's habitual frequency of eating and body weight, leading to the suggestion that a 'nibbling' meal pattern may help in the avoidance of obesity. A review of all pertinent studies shows that, although many fail to find any significant relationship, the relationship is consistently inverse in those that do observe a relationship. However, this finding is highly vulnerable to the probable confounding effects of post hoc changes in dietary patterns as a consequence of weight gain and to dietary under-reporting which undoubtedly invalidates some of the studies. We conclude that the epidemiological evidence is at best very weak, and almost certainly represents an artefact. A detailed review of the possible mechanistic explanations for a metabolic advantage of nibbling meal patterns failed to reveal significant benefits in respect of energy expenditure. Although some short-term studies suggest that the thermic effect of feeding is higher when an isoenergetic test load is divided into multiple small meals, other studies refute this, and most are neutral. More importantly, studies using whole-body calorimetry and doubly-labelled water to assess total 24 h energy expenditure find no difference between nibbling and gorging. Finally, with the exception of a single study, there is no evidence that weight loss on hypoenergetic regimens is altered by meal frequency. We conclude that any effects of meal pattern on the regulation of body weight are likely to be mediated through effects on the food intake side of the energy balance equation.


Br J Nutr. 2010 Apr;103(8):1098-101. Epub 2009 Nov 30.
Increased meal frequency does not promote greater weight loss in subjects who were prescribed an 8-week equi-energetic energy-restricted diet.
Cameron JD, Cyr MJ, Doucet E.


Nutr J. 2012 Nov 21;11:98. doi: 10.1186/1475-2891-11-98.
Intermittent fasting combined with calorie restriction is effective for weight loss and cardio-protection in obese women.
Klempel MC, Kroeger CM, Bhutani S, Trepanowski JF, Varady KA.


Menopause. 2012 Aug;19(8):870-6.
Short- and long-term effects of continuous versus intermittent restrictive diet approaches on body composition and the metabolic profile in overweight and obese postmenopausal women: a pilot study.
Arguin H, Dionne IJ, Sénéchal M, Bouchard DR, Carpentier AC, Ardilouze JL, Tremblay A, Leblanc C, Brochu M.

RESULTS:
Body weight, waist circumference, percentage fat mass, and fat mass decreased significantly and similarly in both groups (P < 0.0001). Both groups showed similar overall decreases in plasma total cholesterol and triglycerides (all P < 0.05). Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol improved significantly in the CD group only, whereas fasting glucose decreased significantly in the ID group only. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol and resting metabolic rate remained stable in both groups. Fasting plasma triglyceride and glucose levels were the only metabolic variables to further improve after the fifth week of the protocol. At the 1-year follow-up, both interventions were associated with successful and similar weight loss maintenance and improvements in fasting plasma glucose levels.
CONCLUSIONS:
The ID resulted in similar short- and long-term changes in body composition and metabolic profile compared with a CD. Most improvements occurred during the first 5 weeks of treatment in both interventions.
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RE: How much should I expect to lose?
12/9/12 10:58 AM as a reply to JCFitCoach.
If that's what works for you , great! I choose to subsribe to the principles that I have learned and what works for us and those that we coach. Best of luck to you!
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RE: How much should I expect to lose?
12/9/12 11:39 AM as a reply to CoachJeffMorgan.
motivFIT:
If that's what works for you , great! I choose to subsribe to the principles that I have learned and what works for us and those that we coach. Best of luck to you!


Problem is we are being told things that just are not true or are being misinterpreted.

But I do agree that we need to find what works for us. But for fat loss what works is energy deficit and not how many meals we eat don't eat or what type of exercise. It's the same with claims that certain foods will make you lose belly fat. Yeah right.

If losing weight was simply a matter of eating more meals most of the folks who eat them should not be overweight but yet most are still overweight. How do we explain that? My guess is they are eating too much and doing too little. Both need addressing.

My point is that you, myself and all our clients that managed to lose weight did so cause of creating a deficit with less calories and exercise and not cause of some meal protocol.

As professionals we need to be able to back up what we say and not just take any ones word for it. Even if an expert or text book said it. If 1 study says something I don't put much into it but if 5 or more show same or similar results then they have my attention.

Calories In Vs Calories Out will always rule in my book.
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Showing 12 results.