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3-DAY REFRESH: GET YOUR BODY BACK ON THE FAST TRACK TO WEIGHT LOSS AND HEALTHY EATING HABITS

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The "zone" aerobic or anaerobic
I have reading up on if it is better to burn fat in the aerobic state, 60-70% of MHR, or anaerobic >70%. Some say at the aerobic state you can burn 60% of the calories as fat and at the anaerobic state as low as 30% of the calories are fat but you burn a lot more calories.

So if you burn a lot more calories that are not fat, then what is that about?

With P90X, I am usually in the 70-80% range. During one of the P90X workouts Tony alludes to being in your "zone" or increase or decrease the effort accordingly.

Inputs appreciated.

Mike
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RE: The
1/3/13 5:25 AM as a reply to MikeK0416.
One of my biggest frustrations with P90X is how many times Tony mentions being in the zone on the videos but never explains what he is talking about. I thought maybe I had overlooked something and so I went back to the Bring It video and the fitness guide to see. Nothing there.

Hopefully someone on the boards can shed some light on this.
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the zone
1/3/13 5:18 PM as a reply to mcartt11.
this is what someone showed me on facebook from bodybuilding dot com

Myth #2:
You Have To Do Your Cardio In Your "Fat Burning Zone."


Again, nonsense.

While you might burn a larger proportion of total calories as fat when you exercise in your fat burning zone, you burn fewer calories overall by exercising at such a low intensity.

When you increase your workout intensity and get out of your so-called "fat burning zone," you burn more total calories, and as a result, more fat.


Increase The Intensity: Burn More Fat.

In addition, the "fat burning zone" training doesn't put "turbulence" on your muscles... so you don't burn many calories in the post-exercise time period. But with interval training, you burn a significant amount of calories for hours after training, and that leads to more fat loss.
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RE: the zone
1/7/13 2:48 PM as a reply to MikeK0416.
Typically the term "being in the zone" means training at certain intensity and maintaining certain heart rate. The higher the heart rate the higher the intensity of your training.

Typically your MAX HR is calculated as 220 - your age. This however does not mean that during your workout your MAX HR cannot exceed this number. You just should not train at your MAX all of the time.

Depending on your individual fitness goals your target HR can change. For example, if you are training for playing some sports (for example professional hockey) then you should train most of the time above 80% of your MAX HR. If you are training for strength then you need to keep your hear rate low and take longer breaks.

Since most people on this board are training for the weight loss (fat burn) the fat burn target zone should be below 70% of MAX HR. However, the is a trick there. You body needs to get rid of all of the glycogen before it will be burning fat so you need to some how get your self in a glycogen depleted state in order to train effectively in fat burning zone. Otherwise you will be burning your glycogen. That's why many people rely on High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT). During HIIT session you combine short bursts of explosive sprints (1 minute at 90% of MAX HR) with periods of lower intensity steady cardio (2 min at 70% MAX HR).

Typically a HIIT workout lasts about 15-25 minutes and after that you will be in a glycogen depleted state. After that you can follow it with another 30-40 minutes of steady cardio.

[Edited by CSBB5]
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RE: the zone
1/5/13 5:51 PM as a reply to AlexanderGarbuz.
great, thank you for the info. My rate goes to greater than 80%, say right during/after pull ups, then goes back to the 70% range shortly thereafter. It will do this pretty much for the entire workout of the evening. Though only in to this for a week, seems like that might hit the mark based on the info you provided.

Thanks again,
Mike
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