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Minimizing Injuries and protecting Joints while doing P90X, Insanity, etc.?
hey everyone,

I was just wondering........

What's the best way to minimize the chance of injury and "protect" your joints while doing intense workout programs like P90X and Insanity?

For a person with joint pain or "problem areas" like a bad back, bad knees, bad shoulders, etc., would programs like P90X and Insanity be too intense and further aggravate the problems?

Should that person start with another program? If so, are there any that you would recommend?

I myself do not have any of those problems. But, I know some people who do, so I'm not sure if I should recommend P90X and/or Insanity to them.

With that being said, I am also concerned about developing those problems myself down the road, and I was wondering if intense programs like P90X and Insanity would contribute to those problems later on.........

Do you think it would be a good idea to supplement P90X or Insanity with some kind of "joint mobility" program ( like the ones by Pavel, Maxwell, Z Health, etc. ) to minimize my chances of injury and protect my joints while doing P90X or Insanity?

thanks.
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It's impossible to answer this with a blanket statement. Every individual is different and across the board those differences are massive.

Both 90x and Insanity are graduate programs, meaning that they were made specifically for our customers who had graduated once of our many intro programs. Each has a fairly rigorous fitness test where, if you can't complete it, you are recommended to start slower.

All of our intro programs are designed and tested on a huge spectrum on individuals and every test group contains some people with upwards of 100 pounds to lose. Our intro programs work, and are safe. Of course everyone we put in a test group has their doctor's approval to exercise. We can't assume what it's like to try our programs with an injury. Obvious, I suppose, given we make programs for a broad base of varying individuals but even perosnal trainers in a gym have liability issues with injury. If you are recommending our programs to folks with injuries you should have them do some homework about their own condition and get signed off and ready before beginning.

Of course we have people who should not be doing a graduate program start them anyway and be successful. We have people begin our programs with injuries and no doctors approval. We don't recommend it but that's the reality. One our of first success stories was a woman over 300 pounds deaf, nearly blind, sick with a bunch of chronic diseases due to obestity and bad luck and was told by her doctor that she needed to be on a ton of medication and it wasn't safe for her to exercise. She began our programs (Power 90) on her own valition. She lost 150 pounds and started running against the recommendation of her doctor with a goal of running a marathon. She kept training and did every program we made. She always got more fit. After many false starts she, still against her doctor's wishes, she completed her first marathon (I have her medal hanging in my gym). She's done 90x, Insanity, lost nearly 200 pounds, takes no medication and now coaches people through marathons and triathlons. Sometimes you just need to plot your own course.

We have had an almost amazingly low injury rate with all of our programs, even Insanity. My background came from working with athletes were injuries were a day to day reality because everyone was pushing their limits, which eventually leads to injury (win or get injured trying). The goal with athletes is to train them in a way that minimizes these injuries to keep them playing but then can never be totally avoided by definition because your goal is 100% efficiency and at 101% you're injured. Compared to that our injury rate seems like it's zero. It's not zero, of course; anybody who loses 150 pounds and goes from, say, 300 pound couch potato to part of the cast of P90X mc2 (I just worked with two of these people) is going to go through a few aches, pains, and minor tweaks but we have a very long track record of getting people fit and keeping them safe, as long as you follow our recommendations.
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Hi Steve,

So sorry for the belated response.

Thank you so very much for your detailed response and explanations. I really appreciate that!
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StraightEdge:
hey everyone,

I was just wondering........

What's the best way to minimize the chance of injury and "protect" your joints while doing intense workout programs like P90X and Insanity?

For a person with joint pain or "problem areas" like a bad back, bad knees, bad shoulders, etc., would programs like P90X and Insanity be too intense and further aggravate the problems?

Should that person start with another program? If so, are there any that you would recommend?

I myself do not have any of those problems. But, I know some people who do, so I'm not sure if I should recommend P90X and/or Insanity to them.

With that being said, I am also concerned about developing those problems myself down the road, and I was wondering if intense programs like P90X and Insanity would contribute to those problems later on.........

Do you think it would be a good idea to supplement P90X or Insanity with some kind of "joint mobility" program ( like the ones by Pavel, Maxwell, Z Health, etc. ) to minimize my chances of injury and protect my joints while doing P90X or Insanity?

thanks.


If you already have or have had issues with your shoulders then I would caution about doing P90X or any program that has you doing a lot of push-ups, chair or bench dips as those will soon or later give you shoulder issues.

I speak from personal experience. Rehabbing my shoulders right now after 2 rounds of the X. An issue that I never had before, even with bodybuilding for 10 yrs. My therapist said that all the push-ups and dips could very well be the cause do to the over use of rotator muscles.

Now this is not to say that everyone will have issues just that the potential is there, especially for us older folks.

Many of us are not used to doing hundreds of push-ups etc and this can present itself as shoulder issues such as impingements, inflammation etc.

I think dive bomber push-ups are bad for the rotators along with the chair dips.
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ok, would like to follow up on this topic.

I guess the 2 main issues that are making me hesitant to restart P90X are the injury issues and the time factor.

When I've searched the internet to compare P90X with other fitness products, those are usually the 2 main issues I've come across. Namely, that most people don't have time for 60+ min workouts, 6-7 days per week. And even if they stick with the program for 90 days, it's not something that they will likely follow for life.

Likewise, people say that the lengthy workouts will wear out your joints/connective tissues and lead to injury, overtraining, etc. Again, making it less likely to stick with the program longterm.

IOW, the complaints against intense programs like P90X and Insanity are that they are simply not sustainable for longterm use, both due to time commitment and potential for injuries.

Now, of course, all of these complaints could be attributed to competitors trying to promote their own products. As Steve detailed above, the injury rate for the Beachbody programs is quite low. Not to mention the countless success stories that you see all over the place.

So, I was trying to think of ways to "counter" these two complaints.

1. Would modifying the P90X and Insanity workouts so that you only do half the workouts ( or keep the workouts in the 20-40 minute range ) help to reduce the chance of injuries or "wearing down" your body?

2. Also, instead of continuously doing intense programs like P90X and Insanity, you can alternate between these intense programs and less-intense ones like 10 Minute Trainer, Power Half Hour, etc. Correct?
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